Club Penguin Wiki
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Club Penguin Wiki

On this page, I will add most of the resources I use for contributing to the wiki. Many users ask about these from time to time, so I thought it would be better if I just create a page with all this information. I will add a summary of the usefulness of each resource in bold. The information on this page is subject to change over time.

Websites

CP Items

CP Items webpage.png

CP Items is a website I have used quite a bit in the past. It updates with the item image, ID, name, type, cost, and whether it is a member item or not whenever new items are released. It also has a search feature which you can use to search for items, furniture, igloos, igloo floors, stamps, and music. However, the most useful thing I find about this site is that you can go into its SWF database and get full images of items. Normally, Club Penguin cuts off items in their own SWF database. For example, look at this SWF for the Beta Hat. The top of the item is cut off for whatever reason Club Penguin does this, but CP Items lets you screenshot large images of items without having to save the SWF from CP's database and modify it so that it is not cut off. This has been useful for uploading item images to the wiki. You can access its database by going here and adding the item ID at the end of the link. You can also change the /clothing to /furniture and use it for furniture images and so on.

JSON files

JSON files webpage.png

Club Penguin's JSON files are useful for finding text-based information such as the official names of items and rooms, IDs, tour guide messages, stamp descriptions, as well as a multitude of other things. You can search for these easily by pressing ctrl+f on your keyboard and typing in the item name, ID, etc.

Penguin avatar database

Penguin avatar database example.png

This is the database Club Penguin started using in October 2011 for the new Buddy List. It contains the player card images for all penguins. It is a better way to take pictures of penguins when you don't want the player card to be in the picture. For example, here is Billybob's penguin. The 11099f08-77a7-4734-b84d-9158c28bbc51 happens to be Billybob's player card ID. Please note that in the link, %7B is Unicode for an opening curly bracket ({) and %7D is Unicode for a closing curly bracket (}). The reason I have mentioned this is just so that you can tell the %7B and %7D apart from the player card ID in the link. As for getting the link to your avatar, you will need Google Chrome. After you have it (or if you already have it), log onto a different penguin and search your penguin in the Buddy List search box. Then, right-click beside the avatar that pops up and click "Inspect element". Finally, find the link to your penguin's avatar by clicking the two collapsing arrows and you'll be able to manipulate the size of the image by changing the size=60 (600 is the largest). You can also change the photo=false to photo=true if you want the background in the image and add &flag=true if you want the pin in the image. When you get it how you want it, you can simply right-click and save the image to your computer.

SandorL's SWFs

SandorL's SWFs webpage.png

SandorL is the creator of a CPPS named "Flippr". His SWFs are useful for uploading item images to the wiki. Using JPEXS Free Flash Decompiler, Penguin-Pal edited the script of the in-game and player card SWF files and made it so that they import a local SWF file on your computer. This allows you to convert them to images using Kurst SWF Renderer and keep the transparency. Plus, it's the fastest method I know of for getting in-game and player card images.

To do this, first save these in-game and player card SWF files to your computer. Next, save the sprite and paper SWF files of an item (you can find them in the SWF section of any item article) to your computer. Then, rename the sprite SWF to "item0" and the paper SWF to "item1". Finally, open the in-game and player card SWFs in Kurst SWF Renderer and convert them to images. The result should be images with the item you chose on an in-game penguin and a player card penguin. You can then delete "item0" and "item1", save another item's sprite and paper SWF files to your computer, and repeat the process. Once you're done, you can use Paint.NET or GIMP to crop the images.

To use this method for item icons, save this SWF, save the icon SWF of an item, and rename the icon SWF to "item". Then, follow the same process as mentioned above.

In the case that the images you render do not have items on the penguin, make sure that the in-game and player card SWF files are in the same folder as "item0" and "item1". If the items still don't appear, try setting the frame rate to 1 and the seconds to 5 in Kurst SWF Renderer (this is to make sure that there's enough time to load the sprite and paper SWF files, though it usually takes only 3 seconds).

In the case that Kurst SWF Renderer cuts off an in-game or player card image, see the SWiX section for an alternative method.

Wayback Machine

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The Wayback Machine is a website that keeps archives of websites. Information about Club Penguin was not always recorded as well when it wasn't as popular as it is now, so this website is useful for finding information on Club Penguin that is no longer available as well as history. You can find old SWFs, old images, and access the old blog posts that Club Penguin removed from their site for some reason. Just type http://clubpenguin.com in the search box, and it will let you choose through many archives recorded throughout the years.

Wiki data generators

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The Club Penguin Wiki's data generators, created by Penguin-Pal, are useful for generating data from Club Penguin or the wiki. On that page, you can find tools such as a player card generator and a "names in other languages" generator. The player card generator works like Club Penguin's avatar database, only you have more control in that you can manipulate the items on a penguin by entering item IDs. Once you're done, you can right-click and save the player card image to your computer. As for the "names in other languages" generator, you can enter the ID of something (clothing, furniture, a room, etc.), choose the information type from the drop-down list, and it will load that information from Club Penguin's JSON files for you so you don't have to go searching through multiple JSON files for the name of something in languages other than English.

Programs

Audacity

Audacity interface.png

Audacity is an audio editing software. I have mainly used it for converting audio files in the MP4 format to the OGG format, as this is the audio format the wiki supports. It has been useful in the past for uploading music to the wiki for things like user page music requests.

Flash Decompiler Trillix

Flash Decompiler Trillix interface.png

Flash Decompiler Trillix is an SWF decompiling software. It is useful for extracting SWFs. I prefer SwfModify, but have resorted to using Trillix to open files that SwfModify could not. Also, Trillix is more stable than SwfModify, can extract frames, and can extract MP3 files from SWFs with music.

GIMP

GIMP interface.png

GIMP is an image editing software. It is simpler than Photoshop and is useful for cropping images and adding transparent backgrounds. I mostly use Paint.NET as I am most familiar with it, but GIMP takes less steps to crop an image with its "Autocrop Image" function. On the other hand, Paint.NET takes less steps to add a transparent background, saves images in smaller file sizes in most cases, and starts up faster.

JPEXS Free Flash Decompiler

JPEXS Free Flash Decompiler interface.png

JPEXS Free Flash Decompiler is an SWF decompiling software. It is useful for editing scripts in SWFs. Since the free version of Flash Decompiler Trillix does not allow you to edit scripts, that advantage has made JPEXS useful. I've used it in the past to edit a script in an SWF file from SandorL's SWF Database. I've also used it to delete an SWF shape that I couldn't delete with SwfModify because it kept crashing.

Kurst SWF Renderer

Kurst SWF Renderer interface.png

Kurst SWF Renderer is a software that converts SWF files to PNG images. It is useful for generating images that keep the transparency from an SWF and faster than taking a screenshot of an image and adding a transparent background using an image editing software. So for example, when you save an SWF of a stamp from Club Penguin to your computer, you can use Kurst to convert it to an image while keeping the transparency of the stamp's shadow (the stamp's shadow is actually transparent - the same goes for the shadow of catalogs, background icons, penguins, etc.). Also, say you don't use Kurst and take a screenshot an image of an item from the CP Items database. When you remove the white background with your image editing software, it will still leave white pixels around the edges of the item. Kurst produces a "clean cutout" of items since it generates the image straight from the SWF. However, sometimes Kurst will cut off the edges of an image or not export a large enough image. To fix that, you can first rescale the SWF with a large placeholder SWF in SwfModify. For more information on that method, see the SwfModify section.

MS Paint

MS Paint interface.png

Microsoft Paint is the default image editing software on Windows computers. It is useful for saving images, such as backgrounds, that do not have transparency to your computer. It currently does not support transparency, so programs such as Paint.NET, GIMP, or Photoshop are better options. However, I always use MS Paint when uploading images that do not need transparent backgrounds to the wiki, as there is no need to use other programs to do so.

Paint.NET

Paint.NET interface.png

Paint.NET is an image editing software. I use it for most of my image editing since it supports transparency and layers. It is useful for cropping images and adding transparent backgrounds. However, the auto cropping takes a few more steps than with GIMP. To do this, you need to select the transparent background with the Magic Wand tool, go to Edit > Invert Selection and then go to Image > Crop to Selection. With GIMP, all you have to do is go to Image > Autocrop Image. This being said, I still mainly use Paint.NET as my image editing software since it is what I am most familiar with. I've also found Paint.NET to save images in smaller file sizes than GIMP in most cases. Plus, it starts up faster.

Photoshop

Photoshop interface.png

Adobe Photoshop is an image editing software. I find it complicated to use, so I mainly only use it for creating GIFs (I believe GIMP also supports GIF creating, but I first learned how to in Photoshop). It is useful for cropping images and adding transparent backgrounds. However, I stick to simpler programs such as Paint.NET and GIMP for that kind of editing.

SwfModify

SwfModify interface.png

SwfModify is an SWF decompiling software. Alongside Paint.NET, this is probably the program I use the most. It is useful for decompiling, replacing, deleting, and extracting SWFs. For example of its usefulness, say you are saving an SWF of an item to your computer. The item is cut off in the SWF, so you open it with SwfModify, click "Modify (All Frames)", and extract the SWF of the full item. Now, the item SWF is ready to be converted to an image using Kurst SWF Renderer or opened with your browser and screenshotted. It is also very useful for cutouts, which you can extract from their SWF files. In another example, say you want to extract a cutout of a building or certain object in a room. You can open the room SWF with SwfModify, click "Modify (All Frames)", and extract your desired SWF. However, I must note that the program is a bit fragile and sometimes crashes while trying to open certain SWF files. In these cases, I use Flash Decompiler Trillix.

If Kurst SWF Renderer is cutting off the edges of an image or not exporting a large enough image, you can rescale the SWF file with SwfModify. To do this, first open an SWF with large dimensions (here's one in case you need it). This will serve as your placeholder SWF. Next, click "Modify (All Frames)", select the shape, click "Replace", click "Target From File", and open the SWF you want to rescale. Then, drag one of the black squares on the corners (make sure it's one of the corner squares so the SWF keeps the aspect ratio) until the SWF fits into the placeholder (if you used the placeholder I provided, it's the gray shadow). Finally, click "OK", click "Save As", and you can replace the old, unscaled SWF file. It is now ready to be converted to an image using Kurst SWF Renderer.

SWF Opener

SWF Opener interface.png

SWF Opener is a software that is useful for opening SWF files, as suggested by the name. However, since you can just open SWF files with your browser, it isn't that useful. If I could compare SWF Opener to anything, I would compare it to a platypus, because it doesn't do much. You can, however, use it to view an SWF with a different background color. This has been useful in the past for capturing the white outlines on pins, but Kurst SWF Renderer does a better job of that.

SWiX

SWiX interface.png

SWiX is a software that is useful for editing the XML code of an SWF file. I've mainly used it in the past for rescaling SWF files that I couldn't rescale with other programs. In an example with wig SWFs, most of the time you cannot extract a wig with its wig stand/mannequin with SwfModify or Trillix. With SWiX, you can open up the SWF, click "View" and make sure that "Movie XML" is checked, and select all of the content and copy it (ctrl+a and then ctrl+c). Then, with the help of Penguin-Pal's quick drop (or this alternative), paste (ctrl+v) the content into the input box, click "go", select all of the content in the output box, and copy it. Finally, go back to SWiX and replace all of the content with what you just copied, and save (ctrl+s). Now, you can use Kurst SWF Renderer to convert the wig SWF file to an image. One thing to note is that sometimes I get an error in SWiX after attempting to open the rescaled XML file. However, I've found that changing some of the quick drop settings, such as the "Multiply shape dimensions by" setting will fix the error. The rescaling process with SWiX takes longer than with SwfModify, but it shouldn't take as long once you do it a few times and use the keyboard shortcuts. I've also used SWiX to loop music SWF files, which you can read about here.

If Kurst SWF Renderer is cutting off the edges of the in-game images you exported from the SWF file from SandorL's SWF Database, first download this special dance SWF. Next, save the sprite SWF of an item, open it in Flash Decompiler Trillix, and extract the first frame, or "Frame 0". Then, open that frame in SWiX, paste all the content into the quick drop, and leave all the settings the same except for changing "Move to bottom" from 1000 to 1250. After copying the output back to SWiX, save it, and then convert both the special dance and frame SWFs with Kurst. When I do this, I set the frame rate to 1, the seconds to 2, and the content scale to 0.3. I recommend setting it to 0.3 because the SWFs are already very large when you convert them, but you can set the scale to 0.4 or larger if you want. Finally, open the special dance image (the penguin sprite) in Paint.NET or GIMP, go to Layers > Import From File... (ctrl+alt+o in GIMP), and import the frame image (the item sprite). You can now press ctrl+m to merge the layers and then crop the image (see the Paint.NET or GIMP section on how to crop).

If Kurst is cutting off the edges of player card images, first download this player card penguin SWF that was extracted from Club Penguin's interface SWF. Next, save the paper SWF of an item, open it in Trillix, and extract the first frame, or "Frame 0". Then, open that frame in SWiX, paste all the content into the quick drop, and change "Move to right" from 1000 to 2500, "Move to bottom" from 1000 to 3000, and "New window size" from 4000 to 10000. After copying the output back to SWiX, save it, and then convert both the player card penguin and frame SWFs with Kurst. When I do this, I set the frame rate to 1, the seconds to 2, and the content scale to 0.1. Finally, open the player card penguin image in Paint.NET or GIMP, go to Layers > Import From File... (ctrl+alt+o in GIMP), and import the frame image (the item paper). You can now press ctrl+m to merge the layers and then crop the image (see the Paint.NET or GIMP section on how to crop).

Scripts

In this section, you can find some scripts that I wrote or contributed to. All are coded in Python, and they are useful for a few things related to Club Penguin and the wiki. I know, very specific, but I wanted to follow a format here. More information can be found on the pages.

Users

Penguin-Pal

Penguin pal walrus.png

Yes, Penguin-Pal is actually getting a section on here. He has more knowledge than me about Club Penguin and the wiki and has helped me a lot in the past. He has created many helpful pages and even has his own wiki with tutorials. He is useful for anything Club penguin or wiki -related that you need help with.

Other users

Walrus Pop Art.png

Most of the admins are also familiar with many of these resources. You can ask these users for help.

Well, that's it!

I hope you found this page useful. I will add more if I can think of any. If you need help with anything, just leave a message on my talk page.

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